Investigation to be launched into Louisville mayor’s handling of Breonna Taylor case

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2 mins read

Darcy Costello
Louisville Courier Journal

Published 4:14 PM EDT Jun 29, 2020

LOUISVILLE, Ky. – Louisville Metro Council intends to launch an into how Mayor Greg Fischer’s administration handled the fatal police shooting of Breonna Taylor, officials announced Monday. 

The city’s Government Oversight Committee, which has subpoena powers, will conduct the probe, according to a news release. 

It is expected to look into the events leading up to and following Taylor’s March 13 death, the release said, as well as, “government transparency and the failure of such, the events surrounding the death of David McAtee, and the use of force during protests.”

Taylor, an emergency room technician, was shot and killed by police who were at her apartment to serve a no-knock search warrant signed by Judge Mary Shaw. Police have said they knocked and announced themselves, but attorneys and neighbors disagree. 

Taylor’s boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, fired a shot as police entered, thinking they were intruders, according to his attorney. Police returned fire, striking Taylor and killing her in her hallway. 

One officer who fired his weapon, Brett Hankison, has been terminated from the police, but is appealing that decision. The other two the department says fired their weapons — Jonathan Mattingly and Myles Cosgrove — have been placed on administrative reassignment.

“We have heard the cries of our citizens,” said Councilman Anthony Piagentini, R-19th District, the committee’s vice-chairman. “They are demanding more transparency about who made what decisions and why related to these troubling events.”

Piagentini and Councilman Brent Ackerson, D-26th, who chairs the committee, said they intend to file a resolution initiating the investigation.

Follow reporter Darcy Costello on Twitter: @dctello

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